A Beginner's Guide to Greek Wine

A Beginner's Guide to Greek Wine

  • Don’t forget the weather: sunny and dry. Greece enjoys an incredibly high annual number of sun hours, a feature that not only attracts German tourists but also makes it possible for grapes to ripen even at the high altitudes necessary for good acid/fruit balance in the grapes. This is also a very dry and windy country, which means much less disease pressure than in, say, Bordeaux, and so a relatively easy path to organic farming.
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Dispatches from Burgundy: June 2018

Dispatches from Burgundy: June 2018

A new generation is shaking up Burgundy. Mathilde Grivot, Amelie Berthaut, Charles Lachaux, Charles Van Canneyt have all reinvigorated their family domaines. Then, there are a handful of new producers like Nicolas Faure, Armand Heitz of Heitz-Lochardet and Maxime Cheurlin of Domaine Georges Noellat. It's hard to believe that another incredibly talented class from the Lycee Viticole de Beaune are now seasoned veterans with many vintages behind them.
flatironwines Admin
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Intro to South Australia

Intro to South Australia

When talking about wine growing in South Australia, I think it's important to reiterate that this is a cool-climate wine growing region. My days there were on average about 14 degrees celsius, or about 57 degrees fahrenheit. I think many people (my prior self included) have an idea that Australia is all warm climate, and this is far from the case. Even knowing that South Australia, and particularly the wine growing regions, are cool climate is something entirely different than being there to experience it myself.
flatironwines Admin
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Top 5 Reasons to drink Cru Bourgeois

Top 5 Reasons to drink Cru Bourgeois

I want to give you five reasons to look beyond Bordeaux' Grand Cru Classé–more specifically, five reasons to look at the Cru Bourgeois wines for delicious values that do everything we want our wines to do.
Jeff Patten
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Aglianico: An FAQ

Aglianico: An FAQ

What is Aglianico?

Aglianico is a grape variety grown in Southern Italy, mostly in Campania and Bascilicata. Most experts consider Aglianico to be one of Italy's "noble" varieties, alongside Sangiovese and Nebbiolo. It is the grape that makes Taurasi, the most famous red wine from south of Tuscany.

Jeff Patten
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Cru Bourgeois 101

Cru Bourgeois 101

If you love wine, especially Bordeaux, you need to pay special attention to this category. It provides some of the very best values in the world for red wines in the $20 - $50 range. And I’m going to explain why in a short series of posts.
Jeff Patten
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Don't miss out on the 2014 Red Burgundy Vintage!

Don't miss out on the 2014 Red Burgundy Vintage!

 2014 was one of those rare vintages in Burgundy that was equally good for red and white wines.  Most of the hyperbole was directed to the fantastic quality of the white wines.  Indeed it is true that from Macon, through the Cote Chalonnaise and in the great growths of the Cote de Beaune - even all the way up to Chablis - the 2014 white Burgundies were hailed by everybody as the greatest vintage since 1992 and so on and on.  They are undeniably marvelous.
Jeff Patten
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Exploring the Fingerlakes

Exploring the Fingerlakes

I recently spent a few days in the Fingerlakes, and though I certainly had my fair share of Riesling and Cabernet Franc, I was also excited about some unexpected wines that several wineries are producing. Chardonnay, Merlot, and even Saperavi are being made with increasing success, not to mention the myriad sparkling wines (both Riesling and non) that have begun popping up. It may be a few years before these are perfected, but as the region continues to grow in technique and tradition, it’s only a matter of time.
flatironwines Admin
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A Brief History of Chateauneuf-du-Pape

A Brief History of Chateauneuf-du-Pape

...in Chateauneuf-du-Pape, there was a castle that the pope lived in. In the 14th century a castle was built on the hill over the village. This was during the Avignon Papacy when the Pope(s) lived in Avignon rather than Rome. Why? Because French King Philip IV finagled the election of a Frenchman, Clement V to the papacy.
Jeff Patten
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Sauvignon Blanc FAQ's

Sauvignon Blanc FAQ's

What is Sauvignon Blanc?

It is a white wine grape variety. It's "home" is in the Loire Valley, but it is one of the French grapes, like Chardonnay, that has become a widely planted and widely consumed "international" grape variety. As many consumers decided that Chardonnay was too "oaky and buttery", many of them moved to Sauvignon Blanc, which is typically crisper, more fruit forward, and more herbaceous.

 

Jeff Patten
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Barbaresco & Barolo: Top 5 Differences

Barbaresco & Barolo: Top 5 Differences

They are both made 100% from Nebbiolo grown in the Langhe. But Barolo and Barbaresco are clearly not the same wine.

What's the difference?

The easy answer is the legal one: Barolo and Barbaresco are two different DOCs. They are located in slightly different parts of the Langhe (see the map above).

There are slightly different rules that they have to follow -- for example Barolos have to be aged for 38 months, of which at least 18 months are in barrel, while Barbaresco only requires 26 months, of which 9 must be in barrel. Barolos have to hit 13% alcohol and Barbarescos only 12.5%.

I guess that sort of thing is great to know for your WSET exam, but it doesn't get you into the heart and soul of how these wines are distinct. Hopefully this list of five key differences will help you do that:

Jeff Patten
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Top 5 Wine Categories for Collectors to Focus on in 2017

Top 5 Wine Categories for Collectors to Focus on in 2017

This year promises to have a lot of very exciting releases. Here's what collectors need to watch out for:
Jeff Patten
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