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Flatiron Wine School Winter 2024 Five-Class Pass!

$200.00

$250.00
NET

This item is not eligbile for our 10% case discount on mixed cases or any other promotional discounts but we took special care to price it competitively compared with other top retailers nationwide.

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 If you're committed to making wine education your cozy-weather project, check out our winter five-class pass, saving you 20%!

Classes are on Tuesdays beginning at 6pm on our mezzanine. Most classes run approximately 90 minutes. 

 Email Julia Burke with questions about Flatiron Wine School.

Find more information about our upcoming classes here

Winter Session: January–February

January 30: Discover Catalonia (taught by Julia Burke, DWSET)

Difficulty level: Wine 101
Fresh off a trip to the spectacular region of Catalonia, Julia couldn't be more excited to share a lineup with you that shows off the rich history and exciting future of this incredibly diverse region. We'll examine the ins and outs (and politics) of Catalonia's dynamic sparkling wine industry as well as its wide-ranging still wines with a lineup that will have you pining for the Penedès. From Cava and Corpinnat to minerally, rich white wines and powerful Priorat, this region truly has something for everyone.

Taught by Flatiron's own Julia Burke, DWSET, this class will begin at 6:00pm on Tuesday, January 30 and run for approximately 90 minutes. Wines tasted in class will be available for purchase with a discount available to attendees only. Seating is limited. Get tickets here.

February 6: Debunking the Natural Wine Phenomenon (taught by Annie Edgerton, DWSET, CS, CSW)

Difficulty level: Wine 101
One of the most hyped buzzwords in wine these days is “natural.” But ironically, it does not have an official definition or regulations, leading to widespread misinformation and confusion. Is the wine “natty”—possibly suffering from spoilage bacteria or other “dirty” phenomenon—or is it merely “low intervention”? Do natural wines taste different? Do they show more terroir? Are they better for you? Are they better for the planet?

Annie will present five wines of different natural styles, while exploring where this sudden explosion of natural wines came from, covering multiple grey-area aspects of the trend, highlighting the best features of these wines, and generating a conversation about the past, present, and future of winemaking... and even of wine itself. This class will begin at 6:00pm on Tuesday, February 6 and run for approximately 90 minutes. Wines tasted in class will be available for purchase with a discount available to attendees only. Seating is limited. Get tickets here.

February 13: Finding the Words for Wine (taught by Julia Burke, DWSET)

Difficulty level: Wine 101
Julia has spent the last 15 years writing about and talking about wine, and if there's one thing she's learned, it's that what most people find most intimidating about wine is the vocabulary. What does it mean when a wine is "confident?" What about tasting notes of "pencil shavings" or "pear drop"? How can we read between the lines on a shelf tag or professional review? If you've settled into some favorite regions and wine styles, but still find yourself lacking the words to explain your tastes and describe the wines in front of you, this class is for you. Julia will walk you through a delicious tasting while helping you interpret common wine terms, build your nose-to-memory connection, and develop a wine language that is meaningful to you.

This class will begin at 6:00pm on Tuesday, February 13 and run for approximately 90 minutes as we taste five wines. Wines discussed in class will be available for purchase with a discount available to attendees only. Seating is limited. 
Get tickets here.

February 20: Bitter-&-Sweet Symphonies: Amaro and Vermouth (taught by Annie Edgerton, DWSET, CS, CSW)

Difficulty level: Wine 101
To know these botanical beauties is to love them. Amari, the bitter-sweet Italian herbal liqueurs flavored with a wide array of herbs and roots, are often consumed on their own as aperitifs or digestifs. Vermouth, the aromatized wine flavored with similar herbs and roots along with flowers and spices, is made in both sweet and dry styles, and historically played a supporting role in cocktails like the Martini, Manhattan, and Negroni. Today, there are a multitude of styles of Vermouth and Amari out there, begging to be sipped on their own, or used to exponentially elevate your cocktail game. Annie will present some exciting Amari and Vermouth to showcase the range of options to bring out the botanical-lover in you, and even give you some of her killer mixology tips! 

This class will begin at 6:00pm on Tuesday, February 20 and run for approximately 90 minutes. Wines tasted in class will be available for purchase with a discount available to attendees only. Seating is limited. Get tickets here.

February 27: This Is How We Fight Climate Change: Emerging Regions and Old Vines (taught by Julia Burke, DWSET)

Difficulty level: Deep Dive

Not a single Flatiron Wine School class goes by without a question about climate change. The answers, as our regular class attendees can attest, are as varied as the speakers giving them, and range from hopeful to downright apocalyptic. So what should we make of it all? In this class, we'll taste both "climate-change-proof" and "emerging region" wines as we dive into the greater concepts at the intersection of wine and climate change, and you'll come out ready to think beyond the ubiquitous "is Pinot Noir over" questions and consider the challenges, opportunities and low-hanging fruit (sorry) facing the wine world from Australia to Norway. What does it mean for the hottest regions? The coldest? The oldest regions? The most up-and-coming? At least as far as wine is concerned, it's not all bad news, and every region's unique approach to addressing climate change is an opportunity to deepen your understanding of winegrowing. 

This class will begin at 6:00pm on Tuesday, February 27 and run for approximately 90 minutes. Wines tasted in class will be available for purchase with a discount available to attendees only. Seating is limited. Get tickets here.

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Difficulty levels (see our FAQ for more info):

Wine 101 means no prior knowledge of the subject matter is assumed. Topic-specific terms and concepts will be introduced. 

Deep Dive means the instructor will get a little more geeky on a more specific topic than in a Wine 101 class. Higher-level terms and concepts will be used and explained. 

Masterclass means the instructor, usually a visiting guest from a winery or wine brand, is fully immersed in the topic at hand and has been encouraged to nerd out. But it's always ok to ask them to explain a concept or define a term––that's what Flatiron Wine School is for! 

Each class begins at 6pm. Classes will last approximately 90 minutes. Wines discussed in class will be available for purchase with a discount available to attendees only. Seating is limited.

 

 

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